english | nederlands

RC 67 Im grossen Schweigen (“Hier liegt das Meer, hier können wir die Stadt vergessen”)

text source

Friedrich Nietzsche, Morgenröthe. Gedanken über die moralischen Vorurtheile Neue Ausgabe mit einer einführenden Vorrede (Leipzig: E.W. Fritzsch 1887), 283-284

first performance

1906-05-20 00:00:00.0 Amsterdam, Concertgebouw

recordings

  • Anniversary Edition 2 Et'cetera KTC 1435 CD2

publications

  • Im grossen Schweigen Donemus / Alphons Diepenbrock Fonds 13849674
  • Im grossen Schweigen (full score)
  • Im grossen Schweigen (vocal score)

  • Im grossen Schweigen (“Hier liegt das Meer, hier können wir die Stadt vergessen”)
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich
  • baritone and orchestra
  • 1905-07-01 00:00:00.0 - 1906-02-02 00:00:00.0 | revised 1918-05-16 00:00:00.0 - 1918-05-19 00:00:00.0
  • duration 23:00

As a student Diepenbrock was fascinated by the prose and ideas of the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Already in 1899 he considered setting Aphorism no. 423 from Morgenröthe (Daybreak) to music. (BD V:5) After a three-week visit to Italy, he started the composition in July 1905, completing it with never diminishing inspiration on 2 February 1906. In the first version of the work the passages in which the text is recited form merely a third of the total number of measures of the composition (157 of the 470). The orchestral introduction already comprises 74 measures. The episodes of varying lengths in which Diepenbrock presents the text are alternated with elaborate orchestral interludes. Remarkably, these proportions are not considered a problem in any of the early reviews of the composition. …more >

Im grossen Schweigen (incipit)


As a student Diepenbrock was fascinated by the prose and ideas of the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Already in 1899 he considered setting Aphorism no. 423 from Morgenröthe (Daybreak) to music. (BD V:5) After a three-week visit to Italy, he started the composition in July 1905, completing it with never diminishing inspiration on 2 February 1906. In the first version of the work the passages in which the text is recited form merely a third of the total number of measures of the composition (157 of the 470). The orchestral introduction already comprises 74 measures. The episodes of varying lengths in which Diepenbrock presents the text are alternated with elaborate orchestral interludes. Remarkably, these proportions are not considered a problem in any of the early reviews of the composition.

Nietzsche wrote the aphorism in Genoa around 1880. In the opening line, the author leaves behind the hustle and bustle of the port to go for an evening walk and suddenly sees the majestic Mediterranean Sea in front of him. When reading this text, this image must already have made such an impression on Diepenbrock that after his visit to Rome and Florence he travelled back by train over Genoa to undergo Nietzsche’s experience himself. (BD IV:393)

With the presentation of a few short melodic fragments in counterpoint, the orchestral introduction places us in the middle of the tumult of the port. The sea announces itself with a new motive suggesting broad waves: three descending seconds, of which the first and second note form a punctuated upbeat. Then the wanderer observes: “Hier ist das Meer, hier können wir die Stadt vergessen.” (Here is the sea, here we can forget the town.) In the following instrumental intermezzo of 45 measures the sea is presented to us in its austere beauty, but we also hear what the wanderer still perceives of the world he has just turned his back to: “Zwar lärmen eben jetzt noch ihre Glocken das Ave Maria […] aber nur noch einen Augenblick” (Indeed, the bells are still ringing the Ave Maria [...] but only for a moment more). To suggest the ringing of the bells, Diepenbrock uses the same three-note motive as in Vondels vaart naar Agrippine (Vondel’s Voyage to Agrippine, RC 64.) After the meaningful words “Jetzt schweigt Alles” (Now all is silent) this section of the composition concludes with a general pause.

An orchestral intermezzo dominated by the ‘waves’ motive is followed by the line “Das Meer liegt bleich und glänzend da” (The sea lies there pale and brilliant) – the beginning of Nietzsche’s reflections on nature, which in comparison to human emotions shrouds itself in a ‘dazzling silence’, eliciting from the author the words “ja, ich bemitleide dich um deiner Bosheit willen!” (yes, I pity you for your malice!) The next orchestral intermezzo of 81 measures is divided into two sections and can be considered the instrumental development of the preceding material. First motives from the introduction are used, whereby the ‘waves’ motive frequently recurs, then the orchestra plays the melody to which the words “Das Meer liegt bleich und glänzend da” were sung. The wind instruments then introduce a new motive of seven relatively long notes, starting with a marked ascending fifth. The second phase of Nietzsche’s contemplations is introduced by the words “Ach, es wird noch stiller und noch einmal schwillt mir das Herz.” (Ah, it is growing even quieter and once again my heart swells.) This is followed by the painful realisation that it is the silent nature that confronts man with the fundamental imperfection of his own speaking; that man will only surpass himself if he is able to overcome these imperfections: “Muss ich nicht meines Mitleidens spotten? Meines Spottes spotten?” (Must I not mock my pity? Mock my mockery?) After the disclosure “O Meer! O Abend! Ihr seid schlimme Lehrmeister! Ihr lehrt den Menschen aufhören Mensch zu sein” (O sea, O evening! You are bad teachers! You teach man to cease to be man.) the seven-note motive sounds again softly in the high strings, however, now with five additional notes; thus it has become the first line of the Gregorian hymn Ave maris stella. But the wanderer pays no attention to this ‘transcendental language’. While he wonders: “Soll er sich euch hingeben? Soll er werden, wie ihr es jetzt seid, bleich, glänzend, stumm, ungeheuer, über sich selber ruhend? Über sich selber erhaben?” (Is he to surrender to you? Shall he become as you now are, pale, brilliant, mute, immense, reposing calmly upon himself? Exalted above himself?), the enticing melody to “Das Meer liegt bleich und glänzend da” sounds. This is followed by another 41 measures by the orchestra: introduced by the opening melody to “Hier ist das Meer, hier können wir der Stadt vergessen”, the sea manifests itself for the last time with an enormous crescendo. Then the complete melody of the Ave maris stella is played in the highest registers of the orchestra, with which the composer, as a Christian, introduces his personal view on the deliverance from imperfection. The work concludes in the radiant key of E major.

Performances and revision
At the premiere by the baritone Gerard Zalsman and the Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by Willem Mengelberg on 20 May 1906, the work was enthusiastically received and reviewed; in general it was considered a new pinnacle in Diepenbrock’s oeuvre. (For the programme notes by the composer, see BD V:651-652.) The premiere was unusual as Im grossen Schweigen was played both before and after the interval. A year later, on 30 May 1907, the work was performed again by the same musicians.

In 1911 (between 1 May and 8 July) Diepenbrock thoroughly revised the composition. As the various orchestral intermezzos were cut back drastically, the work was reduced to 324 measures; the orchestration was also thinned out and a few melodic phrases that were very low for the voice, were rewritten as well. For this reason the voice’s opening passage, originally in E major, was also transposed up a whole tone. Although this alteration changed the original tonal concept of the work based on the key of E major, this adaptation created a direct link to the key of F-sharp in which the orchestral depiction of the sea had just been played. Thus, this connection was abbreviated by 13 measures. In the intermezzo following the first vocal phrase, 39 measures were replaced by 14. As a result, the ‘waves’ motive does not appear in this section. A similar cut of 42 measures followed after the line “ja, ich bemitleide dich um deiner Bosheit willen!”, whereby the entire first part of the instrumental development was deleted. After the final words “Über sich selber erhaben” the 41 measures in which nature manifests itself for the last time were discarded; now the final words are immediately followed by the complete melody of the Ave maris stella. Finally, Diepenbrock expanded the conclusion in E major by eight measures.

In a letter to Johanna Jongkindt of 27 July 1910 we can already read that Diepenbrock considered the composition too long and too heavy and dark. (BD VI:353) When he went through the revised score with Gerard Zalsman in October 1911, the work even seemed very antipathetic to him. (BD VII:270) This was certainly prompted by the fact that through composing Marsyas (RC 101) and Die Nacht (The Night, RC 106) his orchestration had clearly changed under the influence of modern French music, which he himself considered a big improvement. However, the reason for shortening the orchestral intermezzos so drastically also had to do with the fact that Diepenbrock wanted to make the work more accessible and more practical for a future performance.

Even after the revision the composer remained critical about the work. In November 1917 he requested the Concertgebouw Orchestra to cancel a performance of the second version with the excellent Wagner singer Richard van Helvoirt Pel that had already been scheduled: I am no longer satisfied with it. (BD IX:298) Although Diepenbrock revised the score once more in two stages in 1918 (19-28 January and 16-19 May), Im grossen Schweigen was not performed again for decades. It was not until 13 January 1952 that the baritone Laurens Bogtman and the conductor Eduard Flipse performed the work with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, using a provisional edition of Diepenbrock’s final version published by the Alphons Diepenbrock Fund in 1947. A definitive edition appeared in 1974.

However, the fact that the work was well received by a broad audience in 1906 and that both the Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam and the Kaim Orchestra in Munich (conducted by Jan Ingenhoven) played it without any technical problems, should be enough reason to perform the first version of 1906 again (with a few revisions in the orchestration made by the composer after the first performance). It would clarify the original concept of the work and enrich our comprehension of the composer during that period.

Jaap van Benthem & Ton Braas



Im grossen Schweigen

Hier ist das Meer, hier können wir der Stadt vergessen,
Zwar lärmen eben jetzt noch ihre Glocken das Ave Maria –
es ist jener düstere und törichte, aber süße Lärm
am Kreuzwege von Tag und Nacht –
aber nur noch einen Augenblick! Jetzt schweigt Alles!
Das Meer liegt bleich und glänzend da, es kann nicht reden.
Der Himmel spielt sein ewiges stummes Abendspiel
mit roten, gelben, grünen Farben, er kann nicht reden.
Die kleinen Klippen und Felsenbänder,
welche in's Meer hineinlaufen wie um den Ort zu finden,
wo es am einsamsten ist, sie können alle nicht reden.
Diese ungeheure Stummheit, die uns plötzlich überfällt,
ist schön und grausenhaft, das Herz schwillt dabei.
Oh der Gleissnerei dieser stummen Schönheit!
Wie gut könnte sie reden, und wie böse auch, wenn sie wollte!
Ihre gebundene Zunge und ihr leidendes Glück im Antlitz
ist eine Tücke, um über dein Mitgefühl zu spotten!
Sei es drum! Ich schäme mich dessen nicht,
der Spott solcher Mächte zu sein.
Aber ich bemitleide dich, Natur, weil du schweigen mußt,
auch wenn es nur um deiner Bosheit ist, die dir die Zunge bindet:
ja, ich bemitleide dich um deiner Bosheit willen!
Ach, es wird noch stiller, und noch einmal schwillt mir das Herz:
es erschrickt vor einer neuen Wahrheit, es kann auch nicht reden,
es spottet selber mit, wenn der Mund etwas in diese Schönheit hinausruft,
es genießt selber seine süße Bosheit des Schweigens.
Das Sprechen, ja das Denken ward mir verhaßt:
höre ich denn nicht hinter jedem Worte den Irrtum,
die Einbildung, den Wahngeist lachen?
Muß ich nicht meines Mitleidens spotten? Meines Spottes spotten? –
Oh Meer! Oh Abend! Ihr seid schlimme Lehrmeister!
Ihr lehrt den Menschen aufhören, Mensch zu sein!
Soll er sich euch hingeben? Soll er werden, wie ihr es jetzt seid,
bleich, glänzend, stumm, ungeheuer, über sich selber ruhend?
Über sich selber erhaben?

In the Great Silence

Here is the sea, here we may forget the town.
It is true that its bells are still ringing the Ave Maria –
that solemn and foolish yet sweet sound
at the crossroads between day and night –
but one moment more! Now all is silent!
There lies the ocean, pale and brilliant: it cannot speak.
The sky is glistening with its eternal mute evening hues,
red, yellow and green: it cannot speak.
The small cliffs and rocks,
which stretch out into the sea as if to find the loneliest spot –
they, too are dumb.
This vast silence which so suddenly overcomes us
is beautiful and awful, and makes the heart swell.
Oh, the deceit of this dumb beauty!
How well it could speak, and how evilly, too, if it wished!
Its tongue tied up and its face of suffering happiness –
all this is but malice, mocking your sympathy!
So be it! I do not feel ashamed
to be the plaything of such powers.
But I pity you, oh Nature, because you must be silent,
even though it is only malice that binds your tongue:
yes, I pity you for the sake of your malice!
Alas, the silence deepens, and once more my heart swells:
it is startled by a new truth – it, too, is dumb,
it likewise sneers when the mouth calls out something to this beauty,
it also enjoys the sweet malice of its silence.
I come to hate speaking, yes, even thinking:
behind every word I utter do I not hear the laughter
of error, illusion and insanity?
Must I not laugh at my pity? Mock my own mockery?
Oh sea! Oh evening! You are bad teachers!
You teach man how to cease to be man!
Is he to give himself up to you? Should he become as you now are,
pale, brilliant, dumb, immense, reposing calmly upon himself?
Exalted above himself?

 


  • A-50 m grossen Schweigen / Tongedicht für grosses Orchester mit Baritonsolo

    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15
    • 16
    • 17
    • 18
    • 19
    • 20
    • 21
    • 22
    • 23
    • 24
    • 25
    • 26
    • 27
    • 28
    • 29
    • 30
    • 31
    • 32
    • 33
    • 34
    • 35
    • 36
    • 37
    • 38
    • 39
    • 40
    • 41
    • 42
    • 43
    • 44
    • 45
    • 46
    • 47
    • 48
    • 49
    • 50
    • 51
    • 52
    • 53
    • 54
    • 55
    • 56
    • 57
    • 58
    • 59
    • 60
    • 61
    • 62
    • 63
    • 64
    • 65
    • 66
    • 67
    • 68
    • 69
    • 70
    • 71
    • 72
    • 73
    • 74
    • 75
    • 76
    • 77
    • 78
    • 79
    • 80
    • 81
    • 82
    • 83
    • 84
    • 85
    • 86
    • 87
    • 88
    • 89
    • 90
    • 91
    • 92
    • 93
    • 94
    • 95
    • 96
    • 97
    • 98
    • 99
    • 100
    • 101
    • 102
    • 103
    • 104
    • 105
    • 106
    • 107
    • 108
    • 109
    • 110
    • 111
    • 112
    • 113
    • 114
    • 115
    • 116
    • 117
    • 118
    • 119
    • 120
    • 121
    • 122
    • 123
    • 124
    • 125
    • 126
    • 127
    • 128
    • 129
    • 130
    • 131
    • 132
    • 133
    • 134
    • 135
    • 136
    • 137
    • 138
    • 139
    • 140
    • 141
    • 142
    • 143
    • 144
    • 145
    • 146
    • 147
    • 148
    • 149
    • 150
    • 151
    • 152
    • 153
    • 154
    • 155
    • 156
    • 157
    • 158
    • 159
    • 160
    • 161
    • 162
    • 163
    • 164
    • 165
    • 166
    • 167
    • 168
    • 169
    • 170
    • 171
    • 172
    • 173
    • 174
    • 175
    • 176
    • 177
    • 178
    • 179
    • 180
    • 181
    • 182
    • 183

    A-50 entitled Im grossen Schweigen / Tongedicht für grosses Orchester mit Baritonsolo dated on the title page comp. Juli – October 1905. instr. Octob 1905 – Febr 1906 and on the last page Juli 1905 – 2 Febr. 1906 Amsterdam

    • 1905-07-01 00:00:00.0 – 1906-02-28 00:00:00.0
    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: 183
  • A-51 Im grossen Schweigen -2

    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15
    • 16
    • 17
    • 18
    • 19
    • 20
    • 21
    • 22
    • 23
    • 24
    • 25
    • 26
    • 27
    • 28
    • 29
    • 30
    • 31
    • 32
    • 33
    • 34
    • 35
    • 36
    • 37
    • 38
    • 39
    • 40
    • 41
    • 42
    • 43
    • 44
    • 45
    • 46
    • 47
    • 48
    • 49
    • 50
    • 51
    • 52
    • 53
    • 54
    • 55
    • 56
    • 57
    • 58
    • 59
    • 60
    • 61
    • 62
    • 63
    • 64
    • 65
    • 66
    • 67
    • 68
    • 69
    • 70
    • 71
    • 72
    • 73
    • 74
    • 75
    • 76
    • 77
    • 78
    • 79
    • 80
    • 81
    • 82
    • 83
    • 84
    • 85
    • 86
    • 87
    • 88
    • 89
    • 90
    • 91
    • 92
    • 93
    • 94
    • 95
    • 96
    • 97
    • 98
    • 99
    • 100
    • 101
    • 102
    • 103
    • 104
    • 105
    • 106
    • 107
    • 108
    • 109
    • 110
    • 111
    • 112
    • 113
    • 114
    • 115
    • 116
    • 117
    • 118
    • 119
    • 120
    • 121
    • 122
    • 123
    • 124

    semi-autograph A-51 dated on the last page 8 Juli 1911. / gecomponeerd Juli 1905 – 2 Febr. 1906. en geinstrumenteerd / Overgewerkt 1 Mei – 8 Juli 1911. / opnieuw overgewerkt 19 Jan. – 28 Jan 1918. / 16 Mei – 19 Mei 1918

    • 1918-01-19 00:00:00.0 – 1918-05-19 00:00:00.0
    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: 124
  • A-42(3) Im grossen Schweigen

    semi-autograph A-42(3) dated on the title page componirt von Alphons Diepenbrock 1905-1906 Amsterdam

    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: unknown
  • A-52 Im grossen Schweigen, vocal score

    vocal score A-52 dated on the title page Juli – Octob 1905 and on the last page 18 Octob. 1905 (Juli Octob.) Amsterdam

    • 1905-07-01 00:00:00.0 – 1905-10-18 00:00:00.0
    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: unknown
  • A-53 Im grossen Schweigen

    Semi-autograph vocal score A-53 dated on the first page (Juli – Octob. 1905) and with dedication on the title page Voor mijn waarden en trouwen vriend Gerard Zalsman / Alphons Diepenbrock Febr. 1906 with note by Zalsman: 1e Uitvoering 20 Mei '06. / 2e id. 30 Mei '07. / München Nov. '06

    • 1905-07-01 00:00:00.0 – 1906-02-28 00:00:00.0
    • dedication: Voor mijn waarden en trouwen vriend Gerard Zalsman / Alphons Diepenbrock Febr. 1906
    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: unknown
  • A-54 Im grossen Schweigen - vocal score

    copy vocal score A-54

    • location: Diepenbrock Archief Laren
    • pages: unknown
  • R 354 Im grossen Schweigen - vocal score

    copy vocal score Conservatoire de musique Genève R354

    • location:
    • pages: unknown

Im grossen Schweigen uitgevoerd door Robert Holl en het Residentie Orkest o.l.v. Hans Vonk



  • click to enlarge

    Anniversary Edition 2

    cd Et'cetera KTC 1435 CD2
    Concertgebouworkest ♦ Augér, Arleen ♦ Chailly, Riccardo ♦ Holl, Robert ♦ Baker, Janet ♦ Finnie, Linda ♦ Residentie Orkest ♦ Haitink, Bernard

    Tracks: 1 = RC 106; 2 = RC 49; 3 = RC 50; 4 = RC 67

  • Im grossen Schweigen

    1974 Donemus / Alphons Diepenbrock Fonds
  • Im grossen Schweigen (full score)

    1947 Pijper, Willem
  • Im grossen Schweigen (vocal score)

    1948 Reeser, Eduard

20 mei 1906 Eerste uitvoering van Im grossen Schweigen in het Concertgebouw te Amsterdam door Gerard Zalsman met het Concertgebouw-Orkest onder leiding van Willem Mengelberg. Vooraf gaat het voorspel Parsifal, na de pauze volgt een herhaling van Im grossen Schweigen. Het programma bevat de volgende (niet gesigneerde) toelichting van de hand van Diepenbrock:

De tekst van dit werk bevindt zich in een der boeken uit N[ietzsche]'s middenperiode. Het is een stemmingsgedicht in proza-rhythmus, te midden van allerlei andere aphorismen van philosophischen inhoud. De stad waarover gesproken wordt is Genua, waar N. toenmaals woonde. De beteekenis van het voorspel ligt in den eersten zin van den tekst opgesloten. Het is de eenzame gang van den dichter uit de stad naar de zee, in den avond. — De in den aanvang optredende motieven (E moll) hebben een onrustig (subjectief) karakter. Wanneer de tonaliteit van Fis dur optreedt, zetten de harpen violen en bazuinen in, om het in de verte aanzwellend gedruisch der zee te schilderen. De harmoniën en het klankvolume zetten zich uit en voeren met een groot cresendo naar E dur, waarop de zangstem inzet. Daarop volgt een muzikale schildering van dat avondmoment aan het zeestrand waarbij het galmen van grootere en kleinere klokken uit de stad zich mengt in het ruischen der zee. — Na een decrescendo waarbij de kleuren van het orkest al don­kerder worden zet de zanger zijn monoloog weer voort, tot “jetzt schweigt Alles”, waarop een rustpunt volgt en de inleiding van het werk geëindigd is. — Het hoofdthema (E dur) van het daarop volgend 1e deel is de melodische ontwikkeling van het uit 3 dalende tonen be­staande motief, waarmede de violen in de inleiding inzetten:

het lied van de rustelooze zee. De zangstem zet vervolgens de woorden: “Das Meer liegt bleich und glänzend da” (Gis moll) in op eene melo­die die nog 3 keer in het verloop van het werk als herinneringsmotief terugkeert. — Na de woorden “Sei es drum” keeren in het orkest we­derom de gepuncteerde motieven uit den aanvang der inleiding terug, totdat het 1e deel afsluit na de woorden: “ja, ich bemitleide dich um deiner Bosheit willen”. — In een uitgebreid tusschenspel worden nu de verschillende motieven doorgevoerd. Daarbij treedt plotseling een nieuw motief op, eerst in de fluiten,

dan in de trompet

 

Het is de aanvang van den middeleeuwschen kerkhymnus Ave maris stella. Na verschillende stijgingen en dalingen eindigt dit tusschenspel met een groot decrescendo, en begint het 2e en laatste deel bij de woor­den “Ach es wird noch stiller” (D moll). — Na de woorden “Ihr lehrt den Mensch[en]” etc. treedt wederom de 1e zin van den genoemden hymnus op in het allerhoogste register, totdat de zangstem over de harmoniën van F moll en Es dur naar E dur terugkeert bij den slotzin “Ueber sich selber erhaben”. — In het naspel domineert de hoofdtoon­aard (E dur); verschillende motieven krijgen daarin hun uiterste span­ning, tot eindelijk na een groot crescendo de genoemde Hymnus in zijn geheel doorweven met verschillende contrapuntische motieven als triomfzang optreedt, en een korte coda het werk afsluit.

 

Bij den aanvang der Diepenbrock-week, die op uitvoeriger beschouwing dan waartoe nu gelegenheid is aanspraak heeft, past een beknopte mededeeling over de gebeurtenis van gisteren in het Concertgebouw. — Diepenbrock's nieuwste compositie, een tonen-gedicht, op de reeds meegedeelde proza-bladzijde van Fr. Nietzsche gebaseerd, heeft ontzaglijken indruk gemaakt. Door een stemmingsvolle, slechts 'n oogenblik door te helderen koperklank uit het wazig mystieke gerukte uitvoering van Wagner's Parsifal-voorspel waardig ingeleid, is Im grossen Schweigen tweemaal – een pauze gaf de noodzakelijke rust – door het orkest en Gerard Zalsman, met Mengelberg als leider, voorgedragen ten aanhoore van een volle zaal en, later, van een zeer talrijk belangstellend auditorium. Ik heb al vernomen van verlangen naar de derde uitvoering: het is te verklaren! Immers deze Nietzsche-muziek, logisch en helder van bouw, rijk aan melodisch karakter, heeft een stuwende innerlijkheid zoo omvattend en zoo diep, dat niet velen spoedig haar overzien en peilen kunnen. Bezwaarlijk te vinden is de Nederlandsche componist, die het orkest in zoo wonder-elastische golving polyphoon doet zingen als Diepenbrock, en op geen enkelen anderen kunnen we ons beroepen, die het innerlijk uitdrukkingsvermogen zoo sterk en zoo veelzijdig bezit als hij. Zijn Im grossen Schweigen heeft meer dan schilderend-vizionaire en stemming-suggereerende kracht – we ontwaren in zijn muziek de breede, overtuigende ideeën en de zielswerking die verheft. Als bij elke echte groote kunst ondervinden wij haren louterenden invloed te machtiger naar mate wij er, scherpend de fijnste muzikale intuïties, langduriger ons indenken en in-voelen. — Hoe dankbaar diene men Mengelberg en het orkest, en den zanger Zalsman, te zijn: dat zij de uitvoering van Diepenbrock's tonen-dicht op zoo indrukwekkende wijze mogelijk maakten! En hem zelf... heeft men met de gewone uiterlijke teekenen van waardeering gehuldigd, niet wetend hoe anders te doen of te spreken. Eer voegt wel bij Diepenbrock's idealisme het ontroerde zwijgen.

Algemeen Handelsblad (S.Z. [= W.N.F. Sibmacher Zijnen]), 21 mei 1906

pdf All reviews for RC 67 Im grossen Schweigen (“Hier liegt das Meer, hier können wir die Stadt vergessen”)